Dionaea in the key of U(buntu)

arkus keeps adding great features and functionality to Dionaea, when I read the post introducing a new web interface carniwwwhore I couldn’t help thinking I’d got lucky timing, start of a weeks vacation and no real plan for what to do with it. I’ve struggled previously with some of my Dionaea setups, largely because my system was running Debian, whilst Dionaea was built under Ubuntu; doesn’t cause too many problems, just a bit of google-fu, headscratching and stupidity that could have been avoided. From this background I looked through the carniwwwhore pre-reqs with dread, plenty of version requirements that weren’t upto date with my Debian setup; so it’s time to bite the bullet and build a fresh system with Ubuntu.

SSH hardening with Breakinguard

Attacks against SSH services are regularly seen in the wild. Even if you follow best practices for securing the service, the malicious scans will utilise resources available to your environment; CPU, bandwidth etc. In sufficient volume legitimate operation may be impacted as the server rejects failed login attempts.
This is where utilities like Breakinguard come into their own. Basically Breakinguard monitors log files for signs of malicious activity, and once a single source has triggered enough alerts blocks all connections from the source location.

Kippo SVN build

This morning I cause myself a problem. Annoyingly it was foreseeable and avoidable, this is my excuse (not great, but I’ll stick to it). But as every problem is merely an opportunity in disguise whist I’m re-building systems I might as well document the process. The original InfoSanity guide for installing Kippo was based off of the latest stable version, but I rapidly migrated to the development SVN on learning of the MySQL logging capabilities, so this guide covers that.

Example of post exploit utilities (SSH scanners)

So far my Kippo honeypot installation has recieved a number of successful log ins from maliciuos users, some of which have been helpful enough to provide some tools for further analysis. A lot of the archives which have been downloaded show that the kits have been in use for a while, with some archive timestamps going back as far as 2004 (of course this could simply be an incorrect clock on the machine that created the archive). Picking on the most recent download (2010-07-18) I’ve taken a look at the archive containing gosh.tgz.