Archive

Archive for the ‘Presentation’ Category

Disaster Protocol 13 Interview

2010/08/04 1 comment

This week I was interviewed for the Disaster Protocol Security Podcast. My theory is that everyone else was superstitious and didn’t want to risk being on number 13, so they got stuck with me…..

Basically, the interview is just me talking about honeypots and some of the results and findings that have been discussed discussed both on this blog and via Twitter. Hopefully you’ll find it an interesting listen, and hopefully you’ll be able to understand me. Seems a few people have struggled so I’ll need to work on my ‘BBC English’ next time around….

Always interested in hearing others thoughts or comments on honeypots or infosec in general; so if you liked, disliked or disagreed with any of the content let me know.

The podcast episode can be downloaded here.

–Andrew Waite

Categories: Honeypot, Presentation

Digital Security & Governance for SMEs

2010/04/28 Comments off

Yesterday I had the pleasure of attending the Digital Security & Governance for SMEs at Northumbria University. The purpose of the event was to help SMEs better understand that threats targeting their information systems, their responsibilities in securing personally identifiable information (PII) and to introduce NUWARP (more later).

After the event was introduced, the first slot was taken by David Reynolds, CEO of the International Association of Accounts Innovation & Technology Consultants (IAAITC). An accountant may have been a strange choice to start a Digital Security event but that was the point, David covered sensitive information that is handled by all types of businesses as well as covering the legal and regulatory requirements that impact all businesses. Covering the most common compliance topics including the Data Protection Act (DPA) and Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) David did an excellent job of highlighting that information security is relevant to all employees and business types, not just ‘IT’ companies or the secret techie hidden in the back corner.

Next up Paul Holborow from RMT discussed data loss and the impact that this can have on a business. Given the press coverage it received in 2007 it is no real surprise that Paul’s main case study focused on Revenue and Customs lost CDs, but Paul may have been slightly unnerved to discover some of HMRC’s auditors could be found in the audience. If you’ve spent much time working with information security or business continuity planning Paul’s talk wouldn’t have contained too many surprises, one tip that I did take from the talk was that the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) maintains a public list of the complaints that it has investigated, if you’re interested in a particular complaint, or just curious about what the ICO gets involved in give it a look here.

Phil and Colin, both from the University discussed their work into monitoring data leakage from an organisation. Like Paul’s talk previously if you understand and have worked with data leak prevention (DLP) technologies you’re unlikely to be surprised, but the content was definitely new to some of the delegates who I observer furiously scribbling notes. It also seemed to come as a surprise to several delegates when Phil stated that approximately 70% of security breaches are the result of insider’s not ‘mysterious hackers out there’. There were some excellent real-world examples, the one that seemed to hit home to most of the audience was the scenario of the sales person taking the client database with them to a new job. A lot of the statistics used in the talk were sourced from Cyber-Ark’s white paper ‘The global recession and it’s effect on work ethics’ (registration required), definitely worth a read if you’re interested in this area.

Chris Laing provided a live demo of an external attack. As Chris introduced himself as ‘an ethical hacker paid to break into your systems’ I was looking forward to the display, but was disappointed when Chris took control of a Windows 2000 server using an old MSRPC exploit with Metasploit. The scariest aspect of the whole event was the fact that almost every delegate took a deep breath and turned white. I did ask Chris the thinking behind using an old exploit and target, and was told he was concerned about scaring the audience too much and that some of them may be concerned that he was making exploits ‘known’ that target systems they run in production. Personally I would argue that if the exploit is already in Metasploit (framework 2, demo used WHAX as an attack platform) then it is already ‘known’ and that the demo could have had a much greater impact targeting a more recent platform. However I can understand Chris’ reasoning, and the demo still had an impact on those that hadn’t seen Metasploit at work before. My only concern would be that some may have left the event thinking ‘that was scary, glad we upgraded from Windows 2000….’

The last presentation slot was taken by Alison Pickard who discussed ‘What is effective information crisis management’. Covering the ‘softer’ side of information security Alison’s talk did an excellent job of highlighting how simple it can be for organisations to fall foul of information security regulations. Alison introduced an excellent resource that I wasn’t previously aware of in JISC infoNet. if you’re responsible for personal information or it’s security (stop thinking, after Alison’s presentation this means EVERYONE) I’d definitely recommend have a browse and seeing what you can learn.

To finish the event after scaring most of the delegates Chris again took the stage to introduce the Northumbria University Warning Advice and Reporting Point (NUWARP). For those unfamiliar with WARPs, they are:

‘a community based service where members can receive and share up-to-date advice on information security threats, incidents and solutions.’

I was definitely impressed with the proposed services to be provided by NUWARP, hopefully the group should be able to significantly improve the security awareness and defenses of local businesses and those in a wider area. Although there is a cost attached to the services provide I was honestly surprised with how low this was in relation to the specialised knowledge and information available, and as NUWARP is set-up as a non-profit all costs get fed back into the service so the resources available can only improve.

As a taster and bonus to event delegates the event pack included a number of high quality ‘best practice’ data sheets covering a full range of information security topics including the DPA, passwords and securely outsourcing. If you want additional information on NUWARP contact Chris or Phil using information in the links above, the NUWARP is something I would definitely recommend investigating to see how it could help your organisation.

— Andrew Waite

Categories: Event, InfoSec, Legal, Presentation

Direct Access at NEBytes

Tonight was the second NEBytes event, and after the launch event I was looking forward to it. Unfortunately the turn out wasn’t as good as the first event, 56 were registered but I only counted approximately 22 in the audience. The topic I was most interested in was a discussion of Microsoft’s Direct Access (DA), this was billed as an ‘evolution in remote access capabilities’. Being a security guy, obviously this piqued my interest.

Tonight’s speaker covering DA was Dr Dan Oliver, managing director at Sa-V. Before I start I want to state that I have/had no prior knowledge of DA, and my entire understanding comes from the presentation/sales-pitch by Dan tonight, if anyone with more knowledge once to point out any inaccuracies in my understanding or thoughts I’d more than welcome getting a better understanding of the technology.

DA is an ‘alternative’ to VPNs (discussed more later) for a Microsoft environment. The premise is that it provides seamless access to core resources whether a user is in the office or mobile. The requirements are fairly steep, and as Dan discussed on several occasions may be a stumbling block for an organisation to implement DA immediately. These are (some of) the requirements:

  • At least one Windows 2008 R2 server for AD and DNS services
  • A Certificate Authority
  • Recent, high-end client OS: Windows 7, Ultimate or Enterprise SKU only.
  • IPv6 capable clients (DA will work with IPv6 to IPv4 technologies)

As few organisations have a complete Win7 roll-out, and even less have the resources available to roll-out the higher end versions Dan was asked why the requirement. Answer: ‘Microsoft want to sell new versions, sorry’.

With DA pitched as an alternative to VPN at numerous points in the presentation the was a comparison between the two solutions, and to me the sales pitch for DA seemed schizophrenic. Dan kept switching between DA being an improvement to the current VPN solutions completely, and DA being suitable for access to lower priority services and data but organisation may prefer to remain with VPNs for more sensitive data. At this point I couldn’t help thinking ‘why add DA to the environment if you’re still going to have VPN technologies as well’. This was especially the case as Dan stated (and I can’t verify) that Microsoft do not intend to stop providing VPN functionality in their technologies.

From a usability and support perspective DA is recommended as it does not require additional authentication to create a secure connection to ‘internal’ services. Apparently having to provide an additional username/password (with RSA token/smartcard/etc.) needed to establish a VPN connection is beyond the capabilities of the average user.

One aspect that I did agree with (and if you listen to Exotic Liability you will be familiar with) is the concept of re-perimeterisation. The concept that the traditional perimeter of assets internal to a firewall is no longer relevent to protect resources in the modern environment, and that the modern perimeter is where data and users are, not tied to a particular geographical location or network segment. However, rather than the perimeter expending to encorporate any end user device that may access or store sensitive data, Dan claimed that DA would shrink the perimeter to only include the data centre, effectively no longer being concerned with the securityof the client system (be it desktop, laptop, etc.).

This point made me very concerned for the model of DA, if the client machine has seamless, always on access to ‘internal’ corporate services and systems I would be even more concerned for the security of the end user machine. If a virus/trojan/worm infects the system with the same access as the user account, then it too has seamless, always on access to the same internal services. I’m hoping this weakness is only my understanding of the technology, seems like a gaping whole in technology. If anyone can shed any light on this aspect of DA I’d appreciate some additional pointers to help clear up my understanding.

At this point I still can’t see an advantage to implementing DA over more established alternatives, my gut feeling is that DA will either become ubiquitous over the coming years or disappear without making an impact. Due to the fact it doesn’t play nice with the most widely implemented MS technologies, let alone ‘nix or OSX clients and the strict requiremented making a roll-out expensive I expect it to be the latter, but I’ve been wrong before.

At this point I decided to make a speedy exit from the event (after enjoying some rather good pizza) as the second event was dev based (Dynamic consumption in C# 4.0, Oliver Sturm) and I definitely fit in the ‘IT Pro’ camp of NEBytes audience.

Dispite my misgivings from the DA presentation I still enjoyed the event and look forward to the next. If you were at either of the events please let the organisers know your thoughts and ideas for future events by completing this (very) short survey. Thanks Guys.

— Andrew Waite

Categories: Event, MS Windows, Presentation

2009: A review

Well, the year is nearly over and it seems everyone is in a reflective mode so I thought I’d join in. And I’m glad I did, didn’t really just how turbulent year I’ve had. I’d better (on pain of death) start with the none technical, as it is around 12 months since I got engaged to my long-time girlfriend.

Back to the technical: The InfoSanity blog went live in February with the first post. Originally I was far from confident that I would be able to keep up blogging as I had a ‘fear’ of social media and web2.0, but nearly a year on I’m still here and despite some peaks and troughs posting articles regularly. I’ve found it a great platform for getting ideas out of my head and into practice, hopefully I’ve managed to be of benefit to others in the process.

Lab environment: February was also when I purchased the server for my virtual lab environment. This has got be the best buy of the year, providing a solid framework for testing and experimenting with everything else I have done this year. Lab environments also seem to be one of the areas that gathers a lot of interest from others, the two posts discussing configuration of virtual networks and guest systems were InfoSanity’s most popular posts this year by a good margin. In the process of improving my lab environment I also read Thomas Wilhelm’s Professional Penetration Testing book and reviewed it for the Ethical Hacker Network, for which I’m indebted to Don for organising.

Wireless: Included in my long list of purchases this year was an Alfa AWUS036H wireless card and a BU-353 GPS Reciever. This resulted in a basic attempt to write a utility to create maps from the results of wardriving with Kismet, whilst the short development time of the project was enjoyable it was promptly shelved once people introduced me to Jabra’s excellent giskismet. It also resulted in the creation of the still to be field-tested, James Bond-esque warwalking case.

Honeypots: Whilst I had had Nepenthes honeypot system running before the turn of the year, I hadn’t really worked with it in earnest until the first post on the subject in February, and subsequent statistic utilities. These posts also became the topic for my first experience with public speaking, for local (and rapidly expanding) technical group, SuperMondays. As the technology has improved the honeypot system has recently been migrated over to Nepenthes’ spiritual successor Dionaea. Over the year I have also had the pleasure and privilege of talking with Markus Koetter (lead dev of Nepenthes and Dionaea) and Lukas Rist (lead dev of Glastopf), these guys *really* know their stuff.

Public Speaking: As mentioned above I gave my first public talk for SuperMondays, discussing Nepenthes honeypots and the information that can be gathered from them. Unfortunately (or thankfully) there is only limited footage available for the session as the camera’s battery ran out of juice. My second session was for a group of Northumbria University’s Forensics and Ethical Hacking students as an ‘expert speaker’, and I still think they mistook me for someone else. This time a recording was available thanks to a couple of the students, full review and audio available here. My public speaking is still far from perfect, coming out at a rapid fire pace, but I’m over my initial dread and actually quite enjoy it. Hopefully they’ll be additional opportunities in the future.

Friends and Contacts: Throughout the year I have ended up in contact with some excellent and interesting people; from real-world network events like SuperMondays and Cloudcamp, old school discussions in forums (EH-Net) and IRC channels, to the ‘2.0’ of Twitter (@infosanity btw). Along with good debates and discussions I’d also like to think I’ve made some good friendships, too many people to name (and most wouldn’t want to be associated 😉 ) but you know who you are.

So that’s the year in brief, couple of smaller activities along the way, from investigating newly released attack vectors to trying my hand at lock picking. In hindsight it has been one hell of a year, and with some of the side projects in the pipeline I’m expecting 2010 to be even better. Onwards and upwards.

— Andrew Waite

Categories: Honeypot, InfoSec, Lab, Presentation

Expert speaker session at Northumbria University

Last week I had the pleasure of being asked to speak at Northumbria University, presenting to students of the Computer Forensics and Ethical Hacking for Computer Security programmes. As I graduated from Northumbria a few years ago it was interesting to come back to see some familiar faces and have a look at how the facilities had developed.

Despite the nerves of having to speak in front of a crowd I really enjoyed the event, especially as the other speakers were excellent and I enjoyed their sessions. The event kicked off with Dave Kennedy, a soon to retire member of Durham Police’s computer crime unit. Dave’s talked about his personal experience with a couple of high profile cases, explaining some of the groundwork and behind the scenes activity that isn’t known to the general public. I found the information interesting; but also disturbing, given the nature of the material that is handled by Dave and his department I can safely state that I wouldn’t want to have much experience in the area.

Next up was Phil Byrne, an internal auditor for HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). For those that don’t know, HMRC were/are at the centre of one of the UK’s largest data loss stories in 2007 after CDs containing approximately 25 million child benefit records were sent, unencrypted, by standard post and did not reach their intended destination (some backstory here). Phil talked openly about the incident, discussing both the incident itself and the changes made in response. One of Phil’s comments has stayed with me (if I’m mis-quoting someone let me know):

If you put people into the process, something will go wrong at some time

Third to the stand was Gary Witts, owner of a manage services company specialising in on-line backups. The talk was very indepth and had some interesting content, but from my perspective I felt it was more of a sales pitch than a technical discussion of the secure backup’s place within a security standing.

I took the fourth and final slot of the day, which left me with the unenviable position of being between around 100 students and the pub, which didn’t help my usual rapid-fire presentation style. My presentation took a different focus from the previous sessions, discussing some of the real-world security incidents that can regularly be encountered, and some advice on handling the incidents in question. I also discussed my findings from honeypot systems, introducing a less common method for monitoring an environment for malicious activity. Assuming the feedback I’ve recieved is genuine the presentation seems to have been well-recieved.

From a student’s perspective; Tom was in the audience and has been writing up his take on the event in a series of blog postings. Tom also recorded the talks, for any one interested a direct link to my session is available here.

Andrew Waite

May Supermondays Presentation – Video Evidence

2009/05/29 1 comment

I jumped the gun slightly when I said previously that there was no recording of my talk, the camera managed to catch the first 2+ minutes of the presentation. Just enough time for a brief overview of the intention behind honeypot systems. Direct Link.

The rest of the Super Mondays event was recorded more successfully. Check it out here for the official write-up and event videos. Well worth a look.

Andrew Waite